Geological Wonders of the World

Geological Wonders of the World

With age comes stories, and the stories our old Earth tells can be seen in its rock formations. Meteor crashes, volcano eruptions, strong winds, water currents and many other natural erosions are continuously shaping our planet.

Find here some stunningly beautiful places of the world you probably never heard about. Perhaps seeing how beautiful nature can be will help spread the awareness of the damage human being is causing and how important is to take care of this incredible planet.

FUMAROLES YELLOWSTONE, WYOMING, USA

Fumaroles yellowstone.jpg

The Yellowstone Fumaroles in Wyoming are an incredible display of color and geochemistry. A fumarole releases gases such as carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide, among others.

THE BLUE HOLE, BELIZE

Blue-hole-belize.jpg

The Great Blue Hole is a gigantic sinkhole off the coast of Belize that measures 984 ft across and 407 ft deep. The blue hole was formed through karsting episodes of limestone where the limestone dissolves. The dissolution of limestone occurs differently during high and low sea levels, with the Great Blue Hole likely forming over the course of several glaciation cycles.

SALAR DE UYUNI, BOLIVIA

Solar_de_Uyuni_1050x700.jpg

The Salar de Uyuni is the largest salt flat in the world at 4,086 square miles and at 12,000 ft elevation. This salt flat was formed during repeated flooding and drying of the region. During floods, rainwater brings minerals into the Salar, adding to the future salt deposits that form when the Salar dries. 

GRAND CANYON, ARIZONA, USA

Grand Canyon.jpg

The Grand Canyon formed by the entrenchment of the Colorado River during the Laramie orogeny uplift of the region. This orogeny formed the Rocky Mountains and provided the mechanism for the Colorado River to erode down into the underlying rock. The Grand Canyon displays rock from about 200 million to 2 billion years old. 

PAMUKKALE, TURKEY

pamukkale-hot-sprin--terraces.jpg.1000x0_q80_crop-smart.jpg

Pamukkale in Turkey is an incredible display of natural travertine deposits. Travertine is a type of limestone that is deposited by hot springs. The fibrous travertine forms from precipitation of calcium carbonate from solution. 

THE DANAKIL DEPRESSION, ETHIOPIA

Danakil-Depression-desert-by-Russian-photographer-Viktoria-Rogotneva-2.jpg

From Tanzania to Eritrea, the earth is being wrenched apart along the Great Rift Valley and will one day form a new ocean. Volcanic activity abounds along this rift, particularly in the Danakil Depression.

THE DOOR TO HELL, TURKMENISTAN

The door to hell.jpg

‘Door to hell’ is the name given by locals to natural gas field located in Derweze of Turkmenistan. This field was lit by scientists in 1971. Fueled by natural gas, It burn for 42 years and still continues.  The golden glow from ‘door to hell’ can be seen from miles away from the spot.